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Monday, 29 January 2018 00:00

Why Do My Heels Hurt?

The foot is comprised of several tendons and many bones, the largest being the heel bone. One of the purposes of this bone is to cushion the body from pressure the heel may endure during daily activities, such as running and walking. Heel pain is a common ailment, although some people may experience intense pain. This may be due to a condition referred to as plantar fasciitis, characterized by inflammation and irritation occurring in the tissues that support the arch of the foot. It’s generally experienced after sitting for extended periods of time or after the first few steps in the morning. People who are overweight may notice their heels hurt, often due to the additional stress the plantar fascia must withstand. Common symptoms may include numbness in the heel, throbbing pain, or lasting discomfort. A consultation with a podiatrist is advised for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact Dr. Marla Wilson of Advanced Foot & Ankle Care. Dr. Wilson can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Springfield and Litchfield, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Published in Blog
Monday, 22 January 2018 00:00

Common Foot Issues Affecting Seniors

As the aging process occurs, the cushioning in the feet becomes thinner and the nails can become brittle and dry. Sores on the feet may take longer to heal typically due to poor circulation, a common ailment in elderly people. Walking, stretching, and keeping the legs uncrossed are all beneficial in keeping the blood flowing freely. Feet generally become larger over time, and choosing shoes that avoid friction is necessary for a comfortable fit. There are several foot issues elderly people are most likely to experience, including athlete’s foot, dry skin, and ingrown toenails. These conditions may be prevented by washing and drying the feet thoroughly, especially in between the toes. When the toenails are properly trimmed, ingrown toenails may be avoided. Applying a moisturizer on the feet will not only feel good, but help keep the skin from getting dry. Please consult with a podiatrist if you have any questions regarding elderly foot care. 

Proper foot care is something many older adults forget to consider. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Marla Wilson from Advanced Foot & Ankle Care. Dr. Wilson can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

The Elderly and their Feet

As we age we start to notice many changes in our body, but the elder population may not notice them right away. Medical conditions may prevent the elderly to take notice of their foot health right away. Poor vision is a lead contributor to not taking action for the elderly.

Common Conditions 

  • Neuropathy – can reduce feeling in the feet, and can hide many life threating medical conditions.
  • Reduced flexibility – prevents the ability of proper toenail trimming, and foot cleaning. If left untreated, it may lead to further medical issues.
  • Foot sores – amongst the older population can be serious before they are discovered. Some of the problematic conditions they may face are:
  • Gouging toenails affecting nearby toe
  • Shoes that don’t fit properly
  • Pressure sores
  • Loss of circulation in legs & feet
  • Edema & swelling of feet and ankles

Susceptible Infections

Diabetes and poor circulation can cause general loss of sensitivity over the years, turning a simple cut into a serious issue.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Springfield and Litchfield, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Published in Blog
Monday, 15 January 2018 00:00

Buying the Right Shoes for the Right Sport

Proper support is crucial while running and is typically obtained through purchasing running shoes as opposed to shoes designed for walking. Running is considered a high impact sport, and it’s important to have the correct cushioned shoes to help promote proper balance. A firmer sole is important to a runner for maintaining stability, and a sole that’s more flexible is easier for a walker to wear as it grips the toe and the heel. Thick heels are preferred in running shoes as they provide proper cushioning and support for the jogger. If a walker should wear shoes made for running, they may experience conditions such as shin splints or Achilles tendons injuries. This is often because the mechanics of walking and running are different. Running shoes offer features designed to keep the foot in a neutral position and may provide more stability than walking shoes. An additional difference between the two types of shoes may be that running shoes are made of lighter materials that are meant to enable a jogger to move faster.

For more information about walking shoes versus running shoes, consult with Dr. Marla Wilson from Advanced Foot & Ankle Care. Dr. Wilson can measure your feet to determine what your needs are and help you find an appropriate pair of footwear.

Foot Health: The Differences between Walking & Running Shoes

There are great ways to stay in shape: running and walking are two great exercises to a healthy lifestyle. It is important to know that running shoes and walking shoes are not interchangeable. There is a key difference on how the feet hit the ground when someone is running or walking. This is why one should be aware that a shoe is designed differently for each activity.

You may be asking yourself what the real differences are between walking and running shoes and the answers may shock you.

Differences

Walking doesn’t involve as much stress or impact on the feet as running does. However, this doesn’t mean that you should be any less prepared. When you’re walking, you land on your heels and have your foot roll forward. This rolling motion requires additional support to the feet.

Flexibility – Walking shoes are designed to have soft, flexible soles. This allows the walker to push off easily with each step.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Springfield and Litchfield, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Published in Blog
Monday, 08 January 2018 00:00

What Can Cause an Achilles Tendon Injury?

The purpose of the Achilles tendon is to connect the calf muscle to the heel bone. It is the longest tendon in the body, and walking or running would be impossible to accomplish without it. There are several causes for Achilles tendon pain, including inflammation of the tendon, known as tendonitis, or a tear occurring due to sudden movement, often causing severe pain. Surgery may be required to repair the tendon if the patient is unable to walk or stand. Other symptoms may include swelling, stiffness, and reduced strength in addition to experiencing a limited range of motion. There may be several factors which may increase the possibility of an Achilles tendon injury, including a change in the playing surface or an increase in training for athletes. If you think you may have this condition, a podiatrist will be able to help.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Marla Wilson of Advanced Foot & Ankle Care. Dr. Wilson can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What are the symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Springfield and Litchfield, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Published in Blog
Tuesday, 02 January 2018 00:00

How Do I Treat My Bunion?

A large piece of bone protruding on the top or side of the foot may be referred to as a bunion. It’s often the result of inflammation of the tissues surrounding the big toe, in addition to the bones and tendons not lining up correctly. Narrow and high-heeled shoes are a common cause of bunions, which may become larger as time progresses and can possibly cause conditions like bursitis and arthritis. Symptoms can include tingling or numbness of the big toe, nerve irritation, and severe pain. Common bunions typically don’t require an exam, and most will be managed by applying cold therapy, wearing shoes with cushioned pads, and possibly taking anti-inflammatory medications. Surgery may be an option to consider if the pain is persistent or is affecting the quality of your life. A consultation with a podiatrist is advised for treatment of this condition.

If you are suffering from bunions, contact Dr. Marla Wilson of Advanced Foot & Ankle Care. Dr. Wilson can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What is a Bunion?

A bunion is formed of swollen tissue or an enlargement of boney growth, usually located at the base joint of the toe that connects to the foot. The swelling occurs due to the bones in the big toe shifting inward, which impacts the other toes of the foot. This causes the area around the base of the big toe to become inflamed and painful.

Why do Bunions Form?

Genetics – Susceptibility to bunions are often hereditary

Stress on the feet – Poorly fitted and uncomfortable footwear that places stress on feet, such as heels, can worsen existing bunions

How are Bunions Diagnosed?

Doctors often perform two tests – blood tests and x-rays – when trying to diagnose bunions, especially in the early stages of development. Blood tests help determine if the foot pain is being caused by something else, such as arthritis, while x-rays provide a clear picture of your bone structure to your doctor.

How are Bunions Treated?

  • Refrain from wearing heels or similar shoes that cause discomfort
  • Select wider shoes that can provide more comfort and reduce pain
  • Anti-inflammatory and pain management drugs
  • Orthotics or foot inserts
  • Surgery

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Springfield and Litchfield, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Bunions
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